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FSP

German & Jewish Studies FSP Berlin

Berlin, Germany

Program At a Glance

Terms Offered

Winter

Language

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Tandem professor and globe icon
German

Classes In

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Students looking at a chalkboard icon
English

Lodging

Homestay

Department

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college building icon
German Studies
Jewish Studies

ABOUT THIS PROGRAM

The German Studies Department and the Jewish Studies Program offer a joint foreign study program in Berlin, Germany, led by two Dartmouth faculty members, Veronika Fuechtner and Susannah Heschel, who will jointly teach two courses. For the third course, students may elect either to take a German language course at the Freie Universität Berlin or do an independent research project. 

This innovative joint FSP combines the history, literature, theology, culture, and politics of the vibrant Berlin Jewish community that flourished from the eighteenth century to 1933, the fate of the Jews in Berlin during the Third Reich, the reconstruction of the Jewish community in the immediate postwar years, and today's remarkable resurgence of Jewish intellectual, cultural and religious life. The city of Berlin will serve as living text for the program's studies, which will take students to museums and memorials, palaces and hiding places, survivors and eyewitnesses, synagogues, churches and mosques, meetings with distinguished scholars and political, cultural and religious leaders. While focusing on Berlin's remarkable Jewish history, students will simultaneously try to understand a range of transnational migrations of religion and ethnic identity in historical and comparative focus and their interactions within Berlin – for example, the Wilmersdorf mosque as a site of vibrant cultural exchange during the Weimar Republic that also became a vehicle to rescue Jews after 1933.

The course of study will include travel to other cities and countries, possibly including Wroclaw, Krakow and Warsaw (Poland), Prague and Vienna (depending on travel accessibility), as well as shorter excursions to Worms, Cologne, Frankfurt, Dresden and Leipzig (Germany).

For more information about this program, please visit the department website: https://german.dartmouth.edu/foreign-study/jwstgerm-foreign-study-program 

 

Academic Program: German & Jewish Studies

Faculty Director

Curriculum

Course 1: JWST 34.03*
German-Jewish History 
*crosslisted with GERM 44.06

Course 2:  JWST 35*
Remembering Jewish Lives
*crosslisted with GERM 33

Course 3: JWST 85 or GERM 85
Independent Study and Research

All three courses can count towards JWST or GERM credit.

Faculty Director

Curriculum

Course 1: JWST 34.03*
German-Jewish History 
*crosslisted with GERM 44.06

Course 2:  JWST 35*
Remembering Jewish Lives
*crosslisted with GERM 33

Course 3: JWST 85 or GERM 85
Independent Study and Research

All three courses can count towards JWST or GERM credit.

STUDENT LIFE

Students live with homestay families.

The program features several day trips and extended overnight trips with lectures and excursions, some of which may vary depending on the interests of the students enrolled in the program. Day excursions may include trips to Sachsenhausen concentration camp; Leipzig, an important academic center for Jewish Studies; Frankfurt an der Oder as part of the study of the former East Germany; and possibly an overnight trip to Wroclaw, Poland (formerly Breslau, Germany) as part of the program's consideration of Prussia's colonization of part of Poland starting in the 1770s. Two longer trips may include visits to Warsaw, Prague and Vienna.

Berlin offers a rich cultural life, which includes many concerts, film, dance and theater events that relate to the central themes of the program, e.g., a Jewish film festival, an active klezmer music scene or theater shows reflecting on German Jewish culture and history. 

FINANCING YOUR PROGRAM

Tuition and Fees

The fees charged by the College for a Dartmouth-sponsored off-campus term of study include regular tuition charges for a term at Dartmouth, service fees, as well as the specific costs established for each off-campus study locale. In many programs, the room and board costs tend to be higher than for a term in Hanover. You can view a budget sheet for each program by clicking on the appropriate term. The cost of transportation to and from the site is the responsibility of the student.

Financial Aid

In order that all qualified Dartmouth undergraduate students may have the opportunity to take part in off-campus programs, the College endeavors to adjust its normal financial aid awards for students already receiving aid. Tuition and expected family contribution for Dartmouth's off-campus programs are the same as for an on-campus term. Assistance is available to meet extra costs associated with off-campus programs, including airfare. Half of any extra cost is met with additional Dartmouth scholarship; loan assistance is offered for the other half. Loan assistance is also offered to replace the employment that would normally be included in an on-campus term. Although financial aid recipients are given aid to cover all of the required costs of the program, students are responsible for purchasing their own plane ticket and, on some programs, meals. Often this means that part of the expected family contribution is used towards these costs rather than for tuition.

Program Resources

Department Contact

elizabeth_cassell.jpg Elizabeth D. Cassell Comparative Literature, Jewish Studies, Cognitive Science Administrator

Alumni Contact

TBD